Die faszinierende Geschichte des alten Mannes im Flugzeug - NIKIN EU

The fascinating story of the old man on the plane

Could you imagine living in an old airplane in the middle of the forest? It's actually hard to imagine - and yet there's a man who does exactly that. Find out the incredible story of Bruce Campbell here.

Could you imagine living in an old airplane in the middle of the forest? It's actually hard to imagine - and yet there's a man who does exactly that. Find out the incredible story of Bruce Campbell here.

Airplane in the forest

If we truly want to tackle the climate crisis and create new ways to live more sustainably, we must challenge conventional thinking - in all areas of life. That's what Bruce Campbell did. By converting a decommissioned airplane into his home in Oregon, USA, Bruce showed us a whole new perspective on recycling.

Have you ever thought about what happens to old aircraft that are no longer in service? Although they are largely made of recyclable materials, many of them are not fully or improperly recycled and ultimately end up in the trash. With a little imagination and willpower, the potential for recycling and reusing aircraft could be an amazing opportunity.

 

Some notable statistics about old aircraft:

  • The average lifespan of an aircraft is approx. 25-30 years
  • An average of 3 aircraft are taken out of service every day
  • Airlines often offer recyclable parts for sale
  • Storing a decommissioned aircraft costs around $60,000 per month
  • There are several scrapyards in the USA where old aircraft parts are recycled
  • It is estimated that around 12,000 aircraft will be decommissioned in the next 20 years
  • Between 80-95% of an aircraft can be recycled
  • Plastic panels and luggage racks inside aircraft are the most difficult to recycle
  • Around 500 aircraft are dismantled every year, and by 2030 the number is expected to rise to around 2,000 per year
  • Recycling decommissioned aircraft costs approximately $80 million per year
  • The Aircraft Fleet Recycling Association produces around 30,000 tons of aluminum, 1,800 tons of special alloys and 600 tons of other parts every year
  • The new challenge: More modern aircraft made from carbon fiber have better fuel efficiency, but there is currently no safe way to recycle aircraft made from this material
  • Because the cost of recycling aircraft is so high, some are simply left to rust and die without being recycled

 

How does the recycling process work?

The recycling process takes place in a special scrapyard, where in a first step all valuable components and hazardous substances are carefully removed, followed by an assessment of which parts can be resold. The aircraft is then dismantled into its individual parts, with the non-recyclable parts compressed together and ending up in an aircraft graveyard.

Airplane recycling

What is the potential of recycled aircraft?

Bruce not only planted many trees around the property, but also found a way to build an airplane into his house. And while that might not be a practical choice for everyone, it does beg the question of why we can't turn airplanes into all sorts of things. Restaurants, AirBnB's, children's playhouses, shops... why not? All you need is creative thinking and commitment. More sustainability is possible if we dare to try.

 

© This blog was researched, written and published by our partner organization OneTreePlanted. The content was adopted and translated by NIKIN. The blog may contain some differences from the original. You can find the original blog and further information at www.onetreeplanted.org. We have been working with the renowned non-profit organization since 2016 - so far we have been able to plant over 300,000 trees in various places around the world.

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